Wolf Hunting Great Falls MT

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Wolf Hunting. You will find helpful, informative articles about Wolf Hunting, including "Cry Wolf: Guide to Wolves and Wolf Hunting Opportunities". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Great Falls, MT that will answer all of your questions about Wolf Hunting.

Benton Lake Wetland Management District
922 Bootlegger Trail
Great Falls, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting

Lewis & Clark National Forest
(406) 791-7700
P.O. Box 869
Great Falls, MT
Other Activties
Auto Touring; Biking; Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Historic & Cultural Site; Horseback Riding; Hunting; Interpretive Programs; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Visitor Center; Wildlife Viewing

Benton Lake Wetland Management District
922 Bootlegger Trail Great Falls
Great Falls, MT
 
Central Montana Handgunners Club Inc
(406) 538-3476
Brandywine Lane
Lewistown, MT
 
Beaver Creek Campground
West Yellowstone, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting

Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge
(406) 727-7400
922 Bootlegger Trail
Great Falls, MT
Other Activties
Auto Touring; Boating; Hunting; Wildlife Viewing

Gibson Reservoir
(406) 791-7700
P.O. Box 869
Great Falls, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting; Recreational Vehicles

Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge
(406) 727-7400
922 Bootlegger Trail Great Falls
Great Falls, MT
 
Kloppel, David C
406453536
616 Pine Ridge Ct
Great Falls, MT
 
Fleecer Station
(406) 494-0246
1820 Meadowlark Lane
Butte, MT
Other Activties
Biking; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Horseback Riding; Hunting

Cry Wolf: Guide to Wolves and Wolf Hunting Opportunities

Ah, the howl of the wolf. Is any sound in nature more primordial? That eerie call, echoing off the spruce and rock faces of a frozen northern lake on a frigid winter's night, can rouse a man from sleep and fill his head with images of tracks in the snow and gore on the ice.

A wolf is a paradox. On one hand, it is a fearsome predator; on the other, a social animal that, when caught relaxed, is not all that different from the family dog.

There seems to be no middle ground when it comes to them either. Some view them as a welcome indicator species; others as a threat to local livestock and game animal populations.

Our forefathers had no time for that debate - they were too busy trying to make the most of a hostile wilderness. As a result, throughout North America, as in Europe, wolves were shown little mercy. They were trapped, poisoned, and shot. Bounties were collected or their furs were sold. Sometimes, they were just left to rot.

These days, a different attitude pervades. Where wolves still exist, in most of Canada and Alaska, they are, for the most part, treated as a respected game animal capable of putting the most experienced hunter to the test. Where they once roamed, they are often lamented, and in some areas, experimental populations or recovery efforts are being monitored.

With these things in mind, here are a few things that every prospective wolf hunter should know.

The Species
North American wolves are divided into two major groups, Canis Lupus (commonly known as the Gray Wolf) and Canis rufus (the Red wolf). Having said this, in eastern Canada, Canis Lupus Lycaon has recently been recognized as a distinct sub-species that is now called the Eastern wolf.

The Gray wolf is the largest and most widely distributed of the wolves. It is believed that this species originated in Eurasia and crossed the Bering straits into North America long ago.

On average, males weigh 80 to 100 pounds (they can get considerably larger) and have coats that vary depending on location and habitat. Arctic gray wolves (Canis Lupus arctos), for instance, often have a white coat with a dense under fur. Most however, vary from gray and buff to near black.

The Red wolf is a native North American species and considered one of the most endangered species in the world. Originally a resident of the eastern Carolinian forests, early colonists in North America nearly extirpated them. And as their population decreased, inter-breeding with coyotes became more common, posing yet another threat to this species. Adult males weigh between 40 and 80 pounds on average.

Brent Patterson, a wolf researcher for Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources says the Eastern wolf has very similar genetics to the Red wolf but is different - "perhaps this is a case of genetic drift" due to a mixture of gray wolf and coyote interbreeding.

Eastern wolves were referred to as brush wolves and this might not be a bad description of them - in many cases they appear more as coyotes t...

Click here to read the rest of this article from BigGameHunt.net