Alaska Hunting Billings MT

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Alaska Hunting. You will find helpful, informative articles about Alaska Hunting, including "It's Application Season". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Billings, MT that will answer all of your questions about Alaska Hunting.

Almena Diversion Dam
(406) 247-7714
316 North 26th Street
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Hunting; Wildlife Viewing

Fresno Reservoir
(406) 247-7298
P.O. Box 30173
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Fishing; Hunting; Picnicking; Water Sports; Winter Sports

Custer National Forest
(406) 248-9885
1310 Main Street
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Auto Touring; Biking; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Historic & Cultural Site; Horseback Riding; Hunting; Interpretive Programs; Off Highway Vehicle; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Visitor Center; Wildlife Viewing; Winter Sports

Canyon Creek Cabin
(406) 832-3178
Wise River, MT
Other Activties
Biking; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Horseback Riding; Hunting

Clark Canyon Reservoir
(406) 683-6472
1100 Highway 41
Dillon, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Historic & Cultural Site; Hunting; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Water Sports; Wildlife Viewing

Woodston Diversion Dam
(406) 657-6218
316 North 26th Street
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Hunting; Wildlife Viewing; Winter Sports

Nelson Reservoir
(406) 247-7298
P.O. Box 30137
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hunting; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Water Sports; Winter Sports

Monument Peak Lookout
(406) 547-3361
204 W. FOLSOM, BOX A
White Sulphur Spring, MT
Other Activties
Camping; Hiking; Hunting

Hewitt Lake National Wildlife Refuge
(406) 654-2863
Box 5700,
Malta, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Hunting; Wildlife Viewing

Mt. Baldy-Buckhorn Ridge
(406) 295-4693
Three Rivers RD 12858 US Hwy. 2
Troy, MT
Other Activties
Camping; Hiking; Hunting

It's Application Season

There is no offseason.  Some of you may not be ready to think about hunting already, but if you’re sitting on your laurels, daydreaming instead of researching, you’ll have already missed the Alaskan big game drawings and are about to miss the Wyoming elk, Arizona elk and antelope draws.  Before you know it, spring will have passed you by and you’ve already missed all your chances at a limited tag throughout the west.

Others are simply intimidated by the whole process.  In your state you just go buy a license when you’re ready to hunt.  There is no application, no limitation to the number of tags for an area, so the whole concept of lotteries, preference points, applications, deadlines and drawing odds is very foreign.  But applications are just that: foreign.  This may be a foreign language, but it’s not rocket science or paleo-archae-crypto entomology (whatever that is).  There’s some lingo or jargon that you may not be familiar with, but you can always look up an answer or ask for help.

If you want to go hunting in the west, you need to get comfortable with the limited licensing processes.  Sure, Colorado and a few other states have over the counter bull elk tags, but you’re missing out on other opportunities, many of which may be nearly guaranteed, by not taking full advantage of the draws.  If you’re counting on leftover tags, you’re getting the dregs of what would have been available in the drawing.  Those are the limited tags that people aren’t concerned about missing out on. 

So what about the good tags for the good units in the good seasons?  The best tags are almost always available only through limited licensing application processes or drawing, or lotteries or whatever you want to call it.  Even if you are only interested in bow hunting an over the counter, unlimited unit in Colorado, you’re still missing out on accumulating preference points for a future trophy hunt. 

You may not be ready to think about a dream hunt, but you’ll never be able to experience that dream hunt if you don’t take steps toward it so that it can be achievable while you’re still young enough to enjoy it.  If you want to sheep or moose hunt, expect to wait 15 or 20 years for a permit here in the lower 48.  How old will you be then?  How old will you be if you put off your first applications for another five years?  The vast majority of hunters quit hunting in their late 60s.  Those in the best health will continue to hunt into their 70s.  But how many 80 year olds do you know that can tackle 12,000 foot peaks or pack out a moose? 


Mountain goat tags are one of the harder tags to draw.

Of course there are options for getting guaranteed tags in auctions or raffles.  But if you can budget $100,000 for a sheep tag in an auction, you can probably find room in your hunting budget to hire a guide in Canada or Alaska to take you out on a guaranteed tag...

Click here to read the rest of this article from BigGameHunt.net