Mountain Goat Hunting Billings MT

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Mountain Goat Hunting. You will find helpful, informative articles about Mountain Goat Hunting, including "Idaho Mountain Goat Hunting". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Billings, MT that will answer all of your questions about Mountain Goat Hunting.

Almena Diversion Dam
(406) 247-7714
316 North 26th Street
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Hunting; Wildlife Viewing

Nelson Reservoir
(406) 247-7298
P.O. Box 30137
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hunting; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Water Sports; Winter Sports

Custer National Forest
(406) 248-9885
1310 Main Street
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Auto Touring; Biking; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Historic & Cultural Site; Horseback Riding; Hunting; Interpretive Programs; Off Highway Vehicle; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Visitor Center; Wildlife Viewing; Winter Sports

Laurel Rifle Club
406628460
Po Box 21
Laurel, MT
 
Hungry Horse Reservoir
(406) 755-5401
1935 Third Ave. E.
Kalispell, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting; Picnicking; Visitor Center; Water Sports; Wildlife Viewing

Woodston Diversion Dam
(406) 657-6218
316 North 26th Street
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Hunting; Wildlife Viewing; Winter Sports

Fresno Reservoir
(406) 247-7298
P.O. Box 30173
Billings, MT
Other Activties
Boating; Fishing; Hunting; Picnicking; Water Sports; Winter Sports

Laurel Rod & Gun Club
(406) 628-6292
Riverside Park
Laurel, MT
 
Tims Gunsmithing
613 5Th Ave
Laurel, MT
 
Fourmile Cabin
(406) 932-5155
Big Timber, MT
Other Activties
Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting

Idaho Mountain Goat Hunting

In the spring of 2003, I was drawn for a fall Mountain Goat controlled hunt in the Seven Devils Mountains of central Idaho. After years of applying I finally had my goat tag which kicked off an odyssey that would consume much of my spring, summer, and fall.

Preparing for and executing a Mountain Goat hunt is a challenging experience that many hunters dream of taking. However, considering that relatively few hunters have first hand experience of Mountain Goat hunting, this article serves as a guide to discuss some of the highlights of Mountain Goats, planning for your hunt, and the experience of my first Mountain Goat hunt.

The odds. Idaho has relatively good drawing odds for lifetime species such as Mountain Goat and Bighorn Sheep. By lifetime I mean that you generally get to take only one of such species in your lifetime in the state. It’s also the experience of a lifetime for those who draw. And lifetime could also be taken to mean you can spend a lifetime trying to get a tag. But by good odds I mean if you start applying now, you have a decent chance of getting drawn, sometime … odds in the range of 1/10, or worse, each year, are typical. In other states you may be looking at the 1/100 to 1/1000 range. In the Seven Devils Unit (Unit 18/23, Northern Seven Devils) there are typically 4 tags for about 50 (resident and non-) applicants each year, thus odds of about 1/12, pretty good. In other units the drawing odds vary from 1/5 to 1/25. (But be warned, the unit with 1/5 is excruciating country, with difficult access.) I picked the Seven Devils because I had seen goats in there years before, and the unit was scoutable on weekends during the summer.

In Idaho each year all applicants start afresh, on equal playing field for each hunt. Some states have comparable odds, such as Colorado, once you have some preference points. Other states have much more horrible odds. And if you’re a non-resident applicant, you may also be at a further disadvantage. Some states have preference point systems, meaning you put in for a number of years with almost zilch possibility of drawing, until you have been at it long enough to have a competitive number of points. Each year you don’t draw you gain a point. After a number of years, maybe three to ten, you have enough points to have a decent chance of getting picked.

Lifetime (or 'trophy') species tags also tend to cost more than deer, elk, etc. - on the order of a hundred dollars for the resident, and a thousand for the non-. License, application, and permit fees, regulations, drawing odds, and success rates for these species are generally available through each state’s game departments. If you really want one of these goat tags, you may have to move to a state with good odds, pay the big non-resident dollars (or travel north of the Continental U.S.).

The animal. Mountain Goats are white, except for eyes, horns, the end of their nose, and feet. In name they are sometimes mistaken for Rocky Mountain Bighorn ...

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