Rifles Bellingham WA

Looking for Rifles in Bellingham? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Bellingham that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find Rifles in Bellingham.

Checkmate Pawn
(360) 647-2044
3016 Northwest Ave
Bellingham, WA
 
Big 5 Sporting Goods #182
310536061
910 S Burlington Blvd
Burlington, WA
 
Pacific Northwest Hunting Supply
(360) 457-3215
220
Port Angeles, WA
 
Kittitas County Trading Company
(509) 925-1109
103 N Main Street
Ellensburg, WA
 
Yankee Trader -Browning Safe Dealer
466-6538, 253-565-2753
1021 Broadview Dr Fi
Tacoma, WA
 
Trading Post Of Bellingham, Llctransfer Dealer
(360) 398-2469
5655 Guide Meridian
Bellingham, WA
 
Kesselring Gun Shop
(360) 724-3113
4024 Old Highway 99 N.
Burlington, WA
 
Sportco
(253) 922-2581
4602 2oth Street Ea
Tacoma, WA
 
Gun &Bow
(253) 537-6665
13005 Pacific Avenue
Tacoma, WA
 
Wades East Side Guns
(425) 649-5995
13570 Belle-Red Road
Bellevue, WA
 

5 Tips for Sighting in Your Rifle

So you've acquired a new hunting rifle. After saving your hard-earned cash and landing permission from your other half, the gun rests in your hot little hands. It looks great, feels great... it probably smells great... but more importantly does it shoot great? Now its time to hit the range and get this baby sighted in.

Truth is the same holds true for rifles we've had for many years. Chances are they don't require the full-meal-deal, but sighting in, confirming that our equipment is in good working order, or realigning sights is something we should do on a regular basis.

Unfortunately many of us try to kill two birds with one stone. We visit the range infrequently and attempt to sight in and practice shooting all at the same time. It's important to remember, sighting is very different from regular shooting practice. The process of sighting in involves aligning the scope (or other sights) with the firearm when using a specific bullet and load. Shooting practice involves discharging and often experimenting with different positions to allow our bodies to grow accustomed to the form and function of shooting.

Believe it or not, many of us don't sight in properly. It never ceases to amaze me how many hunters pick up their guns once or twice a year, assume it's shooting straight and hit the woods without a second thought. As a professional outfitter I see it all the time. In fact, I've seen guests take it personally when, after arrival in camp, I ask them to take a few practice shots - just to make sure their gun is properly sighted in. As though I'm insinuating that they haven't prepared for their hunt, once in a while I get a hunter who thinks I'm a control freak. Then the truth comes out. After a few shots it becomes obvious; better than half are inevitably in need of scope adjustments. Every one swears that they were shooting one-inch groups at home, but now their rifle requires major scope adjustments. In their defense, a multitude of things can happen to guns in transit. Blunt trauma to cases or directly to the scope itself can throw it way out of whack; hence the need to sight it.

To be honest many of us are guilty of not maintaining our rifle and scope. If you shoot regularly that's one thing; you're constantly checking it and tweaking the scope when necessary. In reality, most of us don't. By in large, recreational hunters pick up their guns a few times each year. Whether you're tuning a brand new rifle or confirming the accuracy of an old one, here are a few tips for sighting in:

1) Bore sight your rifle before shooting
This first step applies mostly to rifles and scopes that have a new marriage. The first time a scope is mounted to a rifle the gunsmith will usually use a bore sighting tool. This tool is used to approximately align the crosshairs of the scope with the rifle barrel. Unfortunately some folks erroneously rely on bore sighting alone to zero their gun. Remember bore sighting can be precise but most often it only approxi...

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