Hunting Trips For Kids Amarillo TX

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Academy
(806) 457-2460
4400 Soncy Rd (at W 45th Ave)
Amarillo, TX
 
Local Loan & Pawn
(806) 376-4173
714 Sw 10th Ave.
Amarillo, TX
 
Pro Shooters Gun & Knife
(806) 355-4867
2412 Paramount Blvd.
Amarillo, TX
 
Riverfields
(806) 351-0980
2465 I-40 West
Amarillo, TX
 
Grand Street Pawn Shop
(806) 373-0141
1201 S Grand St.
Amarillo, TX
 
Club Amarillo Gun
(806) 372-6442
4521 S Osage St.
Amarillo, TX
 
Country Sales & Pawns
(806) 622-0855
Claude Hwy
Amarillo, TX
 
Panhandle Gunslingers Inc
(806) 373-7572
710 S Georgia St.
Amarillo, TX
 
Double D Holdings, Inc
(806) 351-0980
2465 I-40 W.
Amarillo, TX
 
Elizabeth Hilburn
(903) 432-2110
1319 Whispering Springs Dr
Tool, TX
Agency
Travel Leaders/Thomas Hogan Travel (dba OutsideAgentLink.com)
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Destinations
Canada, Caribbean, Egypt, Israel, Italy, Latin America & Mexico, Middle East, U.S. - Hawaii, U.S. - Las Vegas, U.S. - Northeast, U.S. - West
Specialities
Adventure Travel, All Inclusive, Archeology, Budget Travel, Business Travel, Cruising / Cruise Lines, Fishing / Hunting, Group Vacation, Honeymoon, Leisure Travel, Luxury Travel, Religious, Reunions, Senior / Mature Adult, Women's Travel
Website
www.destinationagent.com/annelizabeth

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Building a Big Game Hunter

Teaching Children to Love the Outdoors

Across the nation, there is a concern about declines in the number of hunters. In addition to a significant drop in license and tax revenues, there are worries that the decline could eventually change the relationship between humans and wildlife.

A report from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service show that the number of hunters 16 and older declined by 10 percent between 1996 and 2006 - from 14 million to about 12.5 million. The losses were most severe in New England, the Rocky Mountains, and the Pacific states.

Some of the reasons given for declining numbers of youth hunters are competition for recreational time, loss of opportunities and increasing costs.

Certainly hunting today is different than when I fist carried a gun afield nearly 40 years ago. As a youth I could climb the fence in the back of the yard and have hundreds of acres of upland habitat to wander in. Today there are age restrictions and hunter safety requirements that must be met before a young person can even purchase a license.

Like many fathers, after my children were born I wanted to introduce them to the sport that I loved. I wanted them to experience the joy and pleasure I derived from hunting and being in the outdoors.


The three generations participating in this hunt include a youngster with a toy shotgun.

I did not have to teach my oldest son to love hunting. He was born with the gene and by the time he was three, I couldn't leave him home without provoking a serious tantrum. Today he will gladly climb several thousand feet in steep mountain terrain during poor weather for a slight chance of taking a trophy.


My oldest son with a nice high country mule deer buck.

My oldest daughter likes to fish, but has no interest in hunting. She married about five years ago and our family quickly converted her formerly non-hunting husband. He eagerly joins us on upland or big game hunts whenever possible.

My youngest daughter's interest in hunting was sparked by a love of sporting dogs and watching them work on upland game. She passed her hunter safety class at 16. Although she has carried a tag and a rifle on a couple of hunts, she has never killed a big game animal (her choice). Still, she accompanies us on hunting trips when her schedule allows and she enjoys hiking and glassing. Her husband recently expressed interest in taking a hunter safety class and applying for a license.

Except for my first son, a passion for hunting and the outdoors had to be carefully nurtured. Even though my oldest wanted to accompany me as soon as he could walk I had to make certain his experiences were positive. When taking him along, I had to temper my expectations. I vividly remember trying to sneak through oak brush in pursuit of a mule deer buck and wondering how a boy who weighed 45 pounds could make the same volume of noise as a charging rhino.

At an early age he was willing to stay out all day in any kind of weather. I recall a couple of hun...

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