Hunting Books Sheridan WY

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Bighorn National Forest
(307) 674-2600
2013 Eastside 2nd Street
Sheridan, WY
Other Activties
Auto Touring; Biking; Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Historic & Cultural Site; Horseback Riding; Hunting; Interpretive Programs; Off Highway Vehicle; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Visitor Center; Water Sports; Wildlife Viewing

Dead Swede
(406) 587-9054
Dayton, WY
Other Activties
Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting

Sheridan County Library
(307) 674-8585
335 West Alger St
Sheridan, WY
 
Sheridan County Public Library - Story
(307) 683-2922
20 N. Piney
Story, WY
 
Keystone Ranger Station
(307) 745-2300
2468 JACKSON STREET
Laramie, WY
Other Activties
Biking; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Horseback Riding; Hunting

North Tongue
(406) 587-9054
Dayton, WY
Other Activties
Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting

Sheridan County Library
(307) 674-8585
335 West Alger St
Sheridan, WY
 
Sheridan County Public Library - Tongue River
(307) 655-9726
145 Coffeen Street
Ranchester, WY
 
Gray Reef Reservoir
(307) 235-9325
538 S. Wyoming Blvd.
Mills, WY
Other Activties
Boating; Camping; Fishing; Hiking; Horseback Riding; Hunting; Picnicking; Recreational Vehicles; Wildlife Viewing

Scab Creek Trailhead Campground
(307) 367-4358
432 East Mill Street
Pinedale, WY
Other Activties
Camping; Climbing; Fishing; Hiking; Horseback Riding; Hunting; Picnicking

10 Steps for a Successful Hunt

I have been hunting big game, mostly deer, for over forty years and I am still surprised by the lack of preparation most hunters take before the season starts. Most of my buddies simply throw some gear in the back of a truck on opening day and head for the woods. By the way, most of my friends are not very successful hunters either, because they don't do their homework or fieldwork. See, some serious planning is needed to insure your hunting efforts pay off and you get that big buck you've been after. Well, I suggest we prepare for our big game hunt both at home and in the field, and perhaps months in advance.

For me, the time before the hunt at home is as important as the time in the field, and maybe even more so. Now, keep in mind, not all the time before the hunt is spent at home, because some fieldwork is required if you want to be successful. I have discovered, mostly through trial and error, ten steps that usually make my hunt productive and safe.

1. Determine where you will be hunting and who you will be hunting with. Both of these considerations are important and we will look at them individually. Where you hunt, has a lot to do with the gear you take along for the trip, because a short afternoon hunting trip close to home will require less gear than extended treks into remote backpacking sites.

  • Additionally, for those hunting for two or three day trips near the house you may be able to load up your car or truck with gear and not be worried about weight or what to take. On the other hand, if you have to walk to your hunting site, select your gear with a critical eye, because unused gear is just additional weight you don't need to pack on your back.
  • Now, who you hunt with is important because, as most of us know, not all hunters are created equal. I have found experienced hunters will usually require less gear than a hunter with limited awareness of the sport, so it is important for you to plan your whole hunting trip around the weakest member of your hunting party. By weak, I am speaking of outdoor experience and overall knowledge of hunting, not necessarily a physical condition, but that should be a consideration as well.
  • Make sure you always tell someone where you'll be hunting, who is going with you, how long you will be gone, when to expect you back, and what to do if you do not return on time. Carry a cellular phone if you have one, but for emergency use only. In addition, I suggest you never ever hunt alone because it is simply unsafe to do so.

2. Decide if special permission is required where you will be hunting. If the area is on private property or posted you should get permission before you hunt. Many good hunting trips have gone sour because folks were hunting on land clearly posted "no hunting". Besides being illegal, it is plain common courtesy to ask permission before you enter someone else's property. Keep in mind, some special state hunts may require you to submit a request form (for controlled hunti...

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