Handgun Hunting Washington DC

This page provides useful content and local businesses that give access to Handgun Hunting in Washington, DC. You will find helpful, informative articles about Handgun Hunting, including "Beginner's Guide to Big Game Handgun Hunting". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Washington, DC that will answer all of your questions about Handgun Hunting.

Patuxent Research Refuge
(301) 497-5761
10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop
Laurel, MD
Other Activties
Auto Touring; Fishing; Hiking; Hunting; Interpretive Programs; Visitor Center; Wildlife Viewing

Premier Athletics Club
4201 Wilson Blvd. #110553
Arlington, VA
 
Dick's Sporting Goods
(703) 933-0736
5714 Columbia Pike
Bailey'S Crossroads, VA
 
Art of Scoring Goals
(703) 287-0088
8201 Greensboro Drive, Suite 300
McLean, VA
 
Dick's Sporting Goods
(301) 947-0200
2 Grand Corner Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD
 
Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge
(703) 490-4979
7603 High Point Rd
Lorton, VA
Other Activties
Hiking; Hunting; Interpretive Programs; Wildlife Viewing

Georgetown International Youth Soccer
Po Box 9862
Washington, DC
 
Sasho Cirovski's Maryland Soccer Camp
4423 Lehigh Road #396
College Park, MD
 
Dick's Sporting Goods
(301) 885-1762
11080 Mall Circle Road
Waldorf, MD
 
Modell's Sporting Goods
(202) 399-6583
1518 Benning Road
Washington, DC
Hours
9:30AM - 8:30PM MONDAY - THURSDAY
9:00AM - 9:00PM FRIDAY - SATURDAY
11:00AM - 7:00PM SUNDAY

Beginner's Guide to Big Game Handgun Hunting

The first bugle of the season's challenge penetrated the forest as the huge six-point and brown-tined bull elk announced the beginning of the rut. His buckskin colored coat is matted with the remnants of his nearby wallow. He is mud-coated and urine-soaked and almost out of his mind with only two things that directs his instinct, fighting and mating. Everyplace he treads the wild grasses and small trees are mowed down in a display of his dominance and raw energies. In some areas it looks like a gorilla went on a rampage, complete with an overfill of hormones. It is the rancid scent of this majestic animal along with his disruptive behavior that entices his soon-to-be harem... and his enemies. His bold taunts are soon to be met by other neighboring bulls, all for a shot at the title of becoming king. He'll spare no foe nor will he run from combat, for tens of thousands of years this is what he has been bred to do. You say to yourself you want to harvest him with a handgun?

A safe and successful hunt with a handgun begins long before the season starts. When the autumn leaves begin to change their colors and the morning chill begins to seep into your camouflage clothing, one has to be completely familiar with every aspect of your weapon. That means knowing your handgun inside and out. It's not enough to know your game laws and the "paperwork" of a hunt. Any conduct less than that is not being a responsible hunter.

What Handgun to Choose?

If you desire to hunt with a handgun, without doubt, you need to do your homework. Many hunters who carry a rifle are not comfortable shooting with a handgun. Indeed, there are many reasons why one should hunt with a rifle but once mastered, a change of venue may be just what you are looking for. That's not to say hunting with a rifle is a cakewalk, it can be very challenging and in the favor of the game sought. When you pick up a handgun and decide to hunt big game, the bar is placed even higher.

The first question you must ask yourself is what game species are you going to hunt? Once decided, you can then pour over the many types of handguns you find to be suitable for that purpose. As with rifles, there is no one-gun for all animals. The high-stakes of big game hunting selection for your weapon is narrowed but still offers a wide range of single shot, five or six shot revolvers and semi-automatic handguns. If you are the type of person that flinches when shooting a 20-gauge shotgun, I do not suggest you purchase a 44 magnum or larger revolver. Some big-bore handguns such as the .41, .45, .454 Casul, 45/70 or the Smith & Wesson .500's are mule-kickers and not intended for beginners although some newly introduced hand gunners do quite well with them after proper instruction and experience. The smaller bore handguns (.38 caliber or less) may be suitable for plinking or small game harvest but they don't belong being aimed at big game. I have heard of kills being made with a little .22 on Alaskan Brown ...

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