Cold Weather Hunting Equipment Yonkers NY

Local resource for cold weather hunting equipment in Yonkers. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to hunting gear, weatherproof scents, hunting clothes, hunting shoes, and ice breakers, as well as advice and content on cold weather hunting.

Mickey Kydes Soccer Pro Soccer Camp
49 Clinton Ave.
Dobbs Ferry, NY
Dick's Sporting Goods
(201) 261-2926
Paramus Towne Square
Paramus, NJ
Dick's Sporting Goods
(516) 247-6400
Roosevelt Field Mall
Garden City, NY
Modell's Sporting Goods
(914) 337-3900
2550 Central Park Avenue
Yonkers, NY
10:00AM - 8:00PM SUNDAY

The Lindgren Nursery School and Summer Camp
(201) 768-3550
211 Irving Avenue
Closter, NJ
Dick's Sporting Goods
(914) 328-3487
The Source
White Plains, NY
The Futbol Factory Danubio F.C. Summer Program
Randy Torres; 10 Columbia Place C79
Brooklyn, NY
Sports Authority
(914) 963-3733
750 Central Park Avenue, #200
Yonkers, NY
Golf Trade-In Program, Delivery & Assembly
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 7:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

The Spring School
(201) 541-5780
67 North Summit Street
Tenafly, NJ
Modell's Sporting Goods
(718) 320-2500
2228 Bartow Avenue
Bronx, NY
10:00AM - 8:00PM SUNDAY

Cold Weather Hunting

Cold-weather hunting is not for the faint of heart. I've seen guys throw in the towel after only a day or two, canceling their trip of a lifetime because Mother Nature dropped the mercury into the toilet. Sub-zero temperatures can make the outdoors a miserable place to be. Add wind and humidity to the equation, and things get nasty. Sure you can always hunt a heated blind, but if you need to brave the elements, some planning is in order. Gear up properly and the cold can be manageable. Venture out unprepared and you may as well write off your hunt.

Across the continent outdoorsmen hunt under a variety of conditions. In the southern states heat and humidity present a different challenge. Hunt the far northern states and provinces the snow and cold is a different story altogether. Spending much of my hunting time in Alberta, I've learned what works and what doesn't through trial and error. The coldest conditions I've hunted involved nearly two feet of snow and temperatures that hovered around minus … yes, I said minus 34 degrees Celsius. Trust me when I say that's cold! The only way I survived was by layering with the proper clothing, understanding my limitations, and persevering.

Query anyone who has hunted Canadian whitetails during the November rut and you'll be mesmerized with tales of frosty days on stand. For those with the right gear, plenty of perseverance and most importantly an insatiable desire to conquer the elements, hunting out in the cold can not only produce trophy-class deer, but also an immense sense of accomplishment.

Coping with the Cold
Going on 25 seasons now, I've learned that most of us have a tolerance for cold. Some can handle more; others can't (or won't) handle the cold at all. No doubt, most are capable of pushing the envelope, but unfortunately that's when errors in judgment and shot placement prevail. Learning to identify limits and strategies to cope with the cold can mean the difference between success and a dismally uncomfortable hunt

Whether you are a stand hunter or you like to hunt on the move, the key to staying warm is maintaining blood flow. With many sub-zero days on stand to my credit, I can say from first-hand experience that staying limber is the biggest challenge confronting hunters. The problem with stand hunting is dormancy. It's an ongoing problem; to stay warm, a body must move. Sitting or standing motionless for hours on end inevitably results in the body's core temperature lowering. When the body's core temperature falls below a certain point, involuntary shivering is inevitable. And, as we all know, once the shivering begins, it's all over. No longer are we as focused, let alone able to aim and shoot accurately.

To stay limber and sharp on stand, experienced hunters carefully and cautiously execute subtle, but beneficial exercises. The worst thing you can do is stay motionless for hours on end. By standing up, slowly bending and flexing all joints and tensing then releasing muscles, o...

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