Bear Archery Bows Bozeman MT

Local resource for Bear Archery bows in Bozeman. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to types of bows such as traditional bows, compound bows, youth bows,and Bear Archery accessories, as well as advice and content on Bear Archery young guns.

Northern Lights Trading Co.
(406) 586-2225
1716 W. Babcock
Bozeman, MT
 
Bozeman REI Store
(406) 587-1938
2220 Tschache Street
Bozeman, MT
 
Carroll College Boy's Soccer School
1601 N. Benton Ave.
Helena, MT
 
Bozeman REI Store
(406) 587-1938
2220 Tschache Street
Bozeman, MT
 
CanoeRack
(406) 251-0040
501 N California
Missoula, MT
 
Northern Lights Trad. Co
(406) 585-2090
1716 West Babcock
Bozeman, MT
 
Carroll College Girls Soccer School
1601 N. Benton Ave.
Helena, MT
 
Montana Outdoor Sports
(406) 443-4119
708 N. Main
Helena, MT
 
Cross Currents
(406) 449-2292
326 N. Jackson
Helena, MT
 
Whitefish Sea Kayaking
(404) 862-3513
321 Columbia Ave.
Whitefish, MT
 

Bear Archery Charge Ready-to-Hunt (RTH) Bow Review

While Bear Archery got its start with traditional bows, today the company has expanded to compound bows offering a variety of modern configurations. For this review we are going to be taking a look at the Bear Charge in what they call a Ready-To-Hunt (RTH) package. The idea behind RTH is that the bow should be as close as possible to having everything you need to hit the field and start practicing. A packaged bow that comes with a variety of accessories used to be unheard of years ago, but over the last 7-10 years has become steadily more popular, especially with those just getting into bow hunting.

Fred Bear and the company he started, Bear Archery, is an undeniable icon in the history of modern bowhunting. Today vintage Bear Archery products command a premium and are sought after by collectors. This is striking because Bear Archery was and has always been focused on delivering a good value for its customer. Today that tradition is carried on by Escalade Sports, the owner of Bear Archery and Trophy Ridge.

The current Bear lineup includes everything from a compact/youth bow, such as the Apprentice, to their flagship Carnage that features the latest in bow technology. The Charge is an entry level bow that retails at $299 for just the bow and $399 for a complete RTH package. The RTH package includes Trophy Ridge accessories such as a 3 pin fiber optic sight, quiver, stabilizer, bow sling, string loop, peep sight, and a whisker biscuit.

The Charge is available in three peak pull weights: 50, 60, and 70 pounds and can be reduced 10 pounds each. All bows have an 80% left with a soft wall (no hard wall stop on the cam). Draw length adjustment is generous moving from 26" to 30" in half inch increments without using a bow press. The Charge has a 30" axle-to-axle making it a release only bow with a forgiving 7.75 brace height. Given the relatively long brace height the Charge still turns in a respectable IBO speed of 305fps.


The Charge uses a solo cam design that can be adjusted for draw length without a press.


Back side of the lower cam.

The Charge is only available in Realtree APG; however the fit and finish is excellent. The camo dip job on our review bow is complete with little to no blemishes. The limb pockets appear to be painted with a scratch resistant epoxy.

Bear builds their own limbs using a fiberglass/resin compression method. The limbs on the Charge are split with a characteristic flair closer to the cam. Like most other newer parallel limb style bows, the Charge limbs come with a few caveats. First Bear Archery warns against mounting any dampening accessories more than 2 inches away from the limb pocket. Mounting more than 2 inches away from the limb pocket can damage the limbs creating a dangerous bow and voids the warranty.


The Charge uses a split limb design with flared limbs. Be sure
to put any limb dampeners within two inches of the limb pocket.

The other caveat has really hit home with any modern parallel limb bow...

Click here to read the rest of this article from BigGameHunt.net

Montana Hunting Regulations

Age Requirement:

Hunters over the age of 12 may hunt most species, including big game, provided they pass a hunter’s safety course as required. Resident minors between the ages of 12 and 15 can fish and hunt upland game and migratory birds during the open season with just a conservation license, without completing a safety course. 

Education Requirement:

Effective Oct. 1, 2003, anyone born after Jan. 1, 1985 must have a hunter ed card to purchase a Montana hunting license. We honor cards from all states and provinces.

Bow Education Required:

first time hunters

Orange Required:

Yes